Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/101539
Type: Journal article
Title: Cost and benefit analysis of the adoption of soil and water conservation methods, Kenya
Author: Atampugre, G.
Citation: International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, 2014; 4(8):305-318
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 2250-3153
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Gerald Atampugre
Abstract: This paper assesses the net welfare associated with the adoption of Bench Terraces (BT), Contour Bunds (CB), and Napier Grass Strips (NGS) in the Saba Saba sub-catchment of the Upper Tana catchment in Kenya. An agro-economic survey and informal interviews were conducted in the Saba Saba sub-catchment to elicit farm level quantitative data for the Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA). Financial functions in excel were used to analyze the on-site costs and benefits of adopting the identified SWC technologies on farms with crops such as maize, coffee, and tea. In this research CBA was used as a decision tool after the computation of all cost and benefits were valued in local currency to obtain the Net Present Value (NPV) or net welfare. The results show that investment in SWC measures may not be a feasible short-term option from farmers’ perspective. There is, therefore, a strong case for intervention, especially in the initial years where SWC adoption yields negative returns. Again the maintenance cost was higher for all SWC technologies. This could be attributed to poor construction techniques. Considering the sub-catchment’s erosion risk severity and slope stability, Bench Terrace was found to yield relatively higher on-site net welfare.
Keywords: Soil and Water Conservation; Bench Terraces; Contour Bands; Napier Grass Strips; Cost Benefit Analysis; Kenya
Rights: Copyright status unknown
RMID: 0030055755
Published version: http://www.ijsrp.org/research-paper-0814.php?rp=P323014
Appears in Collections:Geography, Environment and Population publications

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