Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107422
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Type: Journal article
Title: Parent-offspring body mass index associations in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study: a family-based approach to studying the role of the intrauterine environment in childhood adiposity.
Author: Fleten, C.
Nystad, W.
Stigum, H.
Skjaerven, R.
Lawlor, D.
Davey Smith, G.
Naess, O.
Citation: American journal of epidemiology, 2012; 176(2):83-92
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0002-9262
1476-6256
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Responsibility: 
Caroline Fleten, Wenche Nystad, Hein Stigum, Rolv Skjærven, Debbie A. Lawlor, George Davey Smith and Øyvind Næss
Abstract: In the present study, the authors investigated the role of the intrauterine environment in childhood adiposity by comparing the maternal-offspring body mass index (BMI) association with the paternal-offspring BMI association when the offspring were 3 years of age, using parental prepregnancy BMI (measured as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared). The parent-offspring trios (n = 29,216) were recruited during pregnancy from 2001 to 2008 into the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study conducted by The Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Data from self-administered questionnaires were used in linear regression analyses. Crude analyses showed similar parental-offspring BMI associations; the mean difference in offspring BMI was 0.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.16) per each 1-standard-deviation increase in maternal BMI and 0.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.17) per each 1-standard-deviation increase in paternal BMI. After all adjustments, the mean difference in offspring BMI per each 1-standard-deviation increment of maternal BMI was 0.12, and the mean difference in offspring BMI per each 1-standard-deviation increment of paternal BMI was 0.13. There was no strong support for heterogeneity between the associations (P > 0.6). In conclusion, results from the present large population-based study showed similar parental-offspring BMI associations when the offspring were 3 years of age, which indicates that the maternal-offspring association may be explained by shared familial (environmental and genetic) risk factors rather than by the intrauterine environment.
Keywords: Adiposity; body mass index; child; preschool; fathers; infant; mothers; overweight; pregnancy
Rights: © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0030042886
DOI: 10.1093/aje/kws134
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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