Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/110150
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Type: Journal article
Title: The impact of pregnancy loss on men's health and wellbeing: a systematic review
Author: Due, C.
Chiarolli, S.
Riggs, D.
Citation: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 2017; 17(1):380-1-380-13
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 1471-2393
1471-2393
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Clemence Due, Stephanie Chiarolli and Damien W. Riggs
Abstract: Background: Research indicates that men's psychological and physical health outcomes after pregnancy loss differ from those of women. Our goal was to identify all literature with a focus on men's experiences of pregnancy loss in order to outline current evidence concerning men's wellbeing. Methods: A systematic review of literature on men and pregnancy loss was undertaken following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) and Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) guidelines. Literature was sourced from PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, and Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria were 1) studies that focused on pregnancy loss (including miscarriage, stillbirth, and ectopic pregnancy, 2) that men's voices were specifically represented, and 3) that studies were of primary data. Results: A final sample of 29 articles was identified, of which 16 were quantitative, 10 qualitative, and 3 mixed methods. Quantitative and mixed methods studies indicated that while men tended to have less intense and less enduring levels of negative psychological outcomes than women, they are more likely to engage in compensatory behaviours, such as increased alcohol consumption. Qualitative studies indicated that men often feel that their role is primarily as a 'supporter' to their female partner, and that this precludes recognition of their own loss. These studies also reported that men may feel overlooked and marginalised in comparison to their female partners, whose pain is typically more visible. Conclusions: Further research is needed on men's experiences of pregnancy loss, focusing on cultural differences. The experience of gay and/or transgender men who face pregnancy loss is overlooked in the literature to date.
Keywords: Men; pregnancy loss; miscarriage; stillbirth; ectopic pregnancy; systematic review
Rights: © The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
RMID: 0030077713
DOI: 10.1186/s12884-017-1560-9
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT130100087
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

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