Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111909
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Association between body mass index and all-cause mortality among oldest old Chinese
Author: Wang, J.
Taylor, A.
Zhang, T.
Appleton, S.
Shi, Z.
Citation: Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, 2018; 22(2):262-268
Publisher: Springer
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1279-7707
1760-4788
Statement of
Responsibility: 
J. Wang, A. W. Taylor, T. Zhang, S. Appleton, Zumin Shi
Abstract: Objectives: To examine the association between BMI and all-cause mortality in the oldest old (≥80 years). Design: The study used a prospective cohort study design. Setting: Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) between 1998/99 and 2011. Population: 8026 participants aged 80 years and older were followed every two to three years. Measurements: Body weight and knee height were measured. Height was calculated based on knee height using a validated equation. Deaths were ascertained from family members during follow-up. Results: The mean BMI was 19.8 (SD 4.5) kg/m2. The prevalence of underweight, overweight and obese was 37.5%, 10.2% and 4.4%, respectively. There were 5962 deaths during 29503 person-years of follow-up. Compared with normal weight, underweight was associated with a higher mortality risk (HRs: 1.20 (95%CI 1.13-1.27) but overweight (HR 0.89 (95%CI 0.81-0.99)) were associated with a lower risk. Obesity had a HR 0.91 (95%CI 0.78-1.05) for mortality. Conclusion: Among oldest old Chinese, underweight is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality but overweight is associated with a reduced risk. Interventions to reduce undernutrition should be given priority among the oldest old Chinese.
Keywords: Body mass index; Chinese; all-cause mortality; cohort study; older adults
Rights: © Serdi and Springer-Verlag France 2017
RMID: 0030066792
DOI: 10.1007/s12603-017-0907-2
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.