Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/112871
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Type: Journal article
Title: Women versus men with chronic atrial fibrillation: insights from the Standard versus Atrial Fibrillation spEcific managemenT studY (SAFETY)
Author: Ball, J.
Carrington, M.
Wood, K.
Stewart, S.
Citation: PLoS ONE, 2013; 8(5):e65795-1-e65795-9
Publisher: Public Library Science
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 1932-6203
1932-6203
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jocasta Ball, Melinda J. Carrington, Kathryn A. Wood, Simon Stewart (the SAFETY Investigators)
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Gender-based clinical differences are increasingly being identified as having significant influence on the outcomes of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), including atrial fibrillation (AF). OBJECTIVE: To perform detailed clinical phenotyping on a cohort of hospitalised patients with chronic forms of AF to understand if gender-based differences exist in the clinical presentation, thrombo-embolic risk and therapeutic management of high risk patients hospitalised with chronic AF. METHODS: We are undertaking the Standard versus Atrial Fibrillation spEcific managemenT studY (SAFETY) - a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial of an AF-specific management intervention versus usual care. Extensive baseline profiling of recruited patients was undertaken to identify gender-specific differences for risk delineation. RESULTS: We screened 2,438 patients with AF and recruited 335 into SAFETY. Of these, 48.1% were women who were, on average, 5 years older than their male counterparts. Women and men displayed divergent antecedent profiles, with women having a higher thrombo-embolic risk but being prescribed similar treatment regimens. More women than men presented to hospital with co-morbid thyroid dysfunction, depression, renal impairment and obesity. In contrast, more men presented with coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Even when data was age-adjusted, women were more likely to live alone (odds ratio [OR] 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.47 to 3.69), have non-tertiary education (OR 2.69; 95% CI 1.61 to 4.48) and be symptomatic (OR 1.93; 95% CI 1.06 to 3.52). CONCLUSION: Health care providers should be cognisant of gender-specific differences in an attempt to individualise and, hence, optimise the management of patients with chronic AF and reduce potential morbidity and mortality.
Keywords: Atrial fibrillation; cardiovascular diseases; patients; safety studies; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; cardiovascular diseases in women; coronary heart disease; health services research
Rights: © 2013 Ball et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
RMID: 0030087305
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0065795
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/519823
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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