Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/115910
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Type: Journal article
Title: Constructions of alcohol consumption by non-problematised middle-aged drinkers: a qualitative systematic review
Author: Muhlack, E.
Carter, D.
Braunack-Mayer, A.
Morfidis, N.
Eliott, J.
Citation: BMC Public Health, 2018; 18(1):1016-1-1016-10
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1471-2458
1471-2458
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Emma Muhlack, Drew Carter, Annette Braunack-Mayer, Nicholas Morfidis and Jaklin Eliott
Abstract: Background: Current research into alcohol consumption focuses predominantly on problematic drinkers and populations considered likely to engage in risky behaviours. Middle-aged drinkers are an under-researched group, despite emerging evidence that their regular drinking patterns may carry some risk. Methods: We searched Scopus, Ovid Medline, and Ovid PsycInfo for peer-reviewed, English-language publications appearing prior to 31 December 2015 and relating to the construction of alcohol consumption by middle-aged non-problematised drinkers. Thirteen papers were included in our thematic analysis. Results: Middle-aged non-problematised drinkers constructed their drinking practices by creating a narrative of normative drinking via discourses of gender, identity, play, and learning to drink. They also used drinking norms to construct their gender and identity. Health was not identified as a significant consideration for the population of interest when constructing alcohol consumption, except where drinking behaviours were likely to harm another. Conclusions: These results suggest that public health campaigns aimed at reducing alcohol consumption may be more effective if they focus on unacceptable drinking behaviours instead of personal health outcomes.
Keywords: Alcohol consumption; qualitative; systematic review
Description: Published online: 18 September 2018
Rights: © The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
RMID: 0030098046
DOI: 10.1186/s12889-018-5948-x
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP120200175
Appears in Collections:Public Health publications

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