Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/117398
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dc.contributor.authorFechney, J.en
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, G.en
dc.contributor.authorPrabhu, N.en
dc.contributor.authorLaszlo, I.en
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, W.en
dc.contributor.authorHughes, T.en
dc.contributor.authorBockmann, M.en
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, G.en
dc.contributor.authorHanieh, S.en
dc.contributor.authorAdler, C.en
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Oral Microbiology, 2019; 11(1):1-10en
dc.identifier.issn2000-2297en
dc.identifier.issn2000-2297en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/117398-
dc.description.abstractChildren’s oral health is in a dire state, with dental decay (caries) being one of the most common chronic diseases. While the role of bacteria in the oral microbiome and dental caries is established, the contribution of fungi is relatively unknown. We assessed the oral mycobiome in childhood (n = 17), to determine if the composition of fungi varies between children with and without caries. Oral mycobiome composition was assessed by using Illumina MiSeq to sequence the ITS2 region, which was amplified from dental plaque. This revealed that the oral mycobiome in the investigated children contained 46 fungal species. Candida albicans was the most abundant species and was ubiquitous in all samples, indicating this species may not be involved in caries development as previously suggested. While the overall diversity of fungi was similar, independent of caries status (p > 0.05), we found caries influenced the abundance of specific fungi. Children without caries had a significantly higher abundance of 17 species compared to children with caries, which had three enriched species (p < 0.001). While the differentially abundant species between health and caries may be specific to an Australian population, our findings indicate the mycobiome plays a role in oral health.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityJacquelyn M. Fechney, Gina V. Browne, Neeta Prabhu, Laszlo Irinyi, Wieland Meyer, Toby Hughes, Michelle Bockmann, Grant Townsend, Hanieh Salehi and Christina J. Adleren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCo-Action Publishingen
dc.rights© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectDental caries; fungi; oral microbiome; mycobiome; ITSen
dc.titlePreliminary study of the oral mycobiome of children with and without dental cariesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030101933en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/20002297.2018.1536182en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1062911en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1121936en
dc.identifier.pubid387886-
pubs.library.collectionDentistry publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS10en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidHughes, T. [0000-0001-8668-7744]en
dc.identifier.orcidBockmann, M. [0000-0001-8050-0993]en
Appears in Collections:Dentistry publications

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