Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/118024
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dc.contributor.authorHuber, C.D.en
dc.contributor.authorDurvasula, A.en
dc.contributor.authorHancock, A.M.en
dc.contributor.authorLohmueller, K.E.en
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.identifier.citationNature Communications, 2018; 9(1):1-11en
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723en
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/118024-
dc.description.abstractDominance is a fundamental concept in molecular genetics and has implications for understanding patterns of genetic variation, evolution, and complex traits. However, despite its importance, the degree of dominance in natural populations is poorly quantified. Here, we leverage multiple mating systems in natural populations of Arabidopsis to co-estimate the distribution of fitness effects and dominance coefficients of new amino acid changing mutations. We find that more deleterious mutations are more likely to be recessive than less deleterious mutations. Further, this pattern holds across gene categories, but varies with the connectivity and expression patterns of genes. Our work argues that dominance arises as a consequence of the functional importance of genes and their optimal expression levels.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityChristian D. Huber, Arun Durvasula, Angela M. Hancock, Kirk E. Lohmuelleren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.titleGene expression drives the evolution of dominanceen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030102327en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-018-05281-7en
dc.identifier.pubid445890-
pubs.library.collectionGenetics publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS14en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidHuber, C.D. [0000-0002-2267-2604]en
Appears in Collections:Genetics publications

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