Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/118374
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Type: Journal article
Title: Generalisation of the eddy-dissipation concept for jet flames with low turbulence and low Damköhler number
Author: Evans, M.
Petre, C.
Medwell, P.
Parente, A.
Citation: Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, 2019; 37(4):4497-4505
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2019
ISSN: 1540-7489
1873-2704
Statement of
Responsibility: 
M.J.Evans, C.Petre, P.R.Medwell, A.Parente
Abstract: Moderate or intense low oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion has been the focus of a range of fundamental experimental and numerical studies. Reasonable agreement between experimental and numerical investigations, however, requires finite-rate chemistry models and, often, ad hoc model adjustment. To remedy this, an adaptive eddy dissipation concept (EDC) combustion model has previously been developed to target conditions encountered in MILD combustion; however, this model relies on a simplified, pre-defined assumption about the combustion chemistry. The present paper reports a generalised version of the modified EDC model without the need for an assumed, single-step chemical reaction or ad hoc coefficient tuning. The results show good agreement with experimental measurements of two CH4/H2 flames in hot coflows, showing improvements over the standard EDC model as well as the previously published modified EDC model. The updated version of the EDC model also demonstrates the capacity to reproduce the downstream transition in flame structure of a MILD jet flame seen experimentally, but which has previously proven challenging to capture computationally. Analyses of the previously identified dominant heat-release reactions provide insight into the structural differences between a conventional autoignitive flame and a flame in the MILD combustion regime, whilst highlighting the requirement for a generalised EDC combustion model.
Keywords: Eddy dissipation concept; MILD combustion; vitiated coflow
Rights: © 2018 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0030091645
DOI: 10.1016/j.proci.2018.06.017
Appears in Collections:Mechanical Engineering publications

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