Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/119824
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Type: Journal article
Title: Who is doing well: age 15 predictors of psychological and physical health in young adulthood
Author: Delfabbro, P.
Stevenson, J.
Malvaso, C.
Duong, D.
Winefield, H.
Winefield, A.
Hammarström, A.
Citation: Australian Psychologist, 2019; 54(2):114-124
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2019
ISSN: 0005-0067
1742-9544
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Paul Delfabbro, Jeremy Stevenson, Catia Malvaso, David Duong, Helen Winefield, Anthony Winefield, Anne Hammarström
Abstract: Objective: According to Diener (1984), wellbeing is a multi‐faceted concept reflecting satisfaction with life, good physical health, and fewer negative psychological symptoms. Using data from a 10‐year longitudinal study of school leavers (n = 390), we examine whether people aged 25 can be differentiated into clusters based on indicators of wellbeing, then whether membership in the healthy as opposed to the less healthy cluster can be predicted by age 15 variables. Method: Tested predictor variables at age 15 captured the major influences in Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Theory (1979) including individual, family, and social influences. Young adults (age 25) were differentiated into two clusters based on indicators of mental health and subjective wellbeing. Results: Poorer health, self‐image, family functioning, and peer relations at age 15 predicted poorer overall wellbeing at age 25. Conclusions: Results underscore the potential value of psychological support for adolescents within the school environment and the early identification of individuals at risk of problems which may persist into adulthood.
Keywords: Adolescence; family factors; health; longitudinal studies; social environment; wellbeing
Rights: © 2018 The Australian Psychological Society
RMID: 0030105203
DOI: 10.1111/ap.12369
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0879497
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

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