Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/121655
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Type: Journal article
Title: A novel ruthenium-based molecular sensor to detect endothelial nitric oxide
Author: Vidanapathirana, A.
Pullen, B.
Zhang, R.
Duong, M.
Goyne, J.
Zhang, X.
Bonder, C.
Abell, A.
Bursill, C.
Nicholls, S.
Psaltis, P.
Citation: Scientific Reports, 2019; 9(1):1720-1-1720-16
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2019
ISSN: 2045-2322
2045-2322
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Achini K. Vidanapathirana, Benjamin J. Pullen, Run Zhang, MyNgan Duong, Jarrad M. Goyne, Xiaozhou Zhang, Claudine S. Bonder, Andrew D. Abell, Christina A. Bursill, Stephen J. Nicholls, Peter J. Psaltis
Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of endothelial cell and vascular function. The direct measurement of NO is challenging due to its short half-life, and as such surrogate measurements are typically used to approximate its relative concentrations. Here we demonstrate that ruthenium-based [Ru(bpy)2(dabpy)]2+ is a potent sensor for NO in its irreversible, NO-bound active form, [Ru(bpy)2(T-bpy)]2+. Using spectrophotometry we established the sensor's ability to detect and measure soluble NO in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-free media. Endothelial cells cultured with acetylcholine or hydrogen peroxide to induce endogenous NO production showed modest increases of 7.3 ± 7.1% and 36.3 ± 25.0% respectively in fluorescence signal from baseline state, while addition of exogenous NO increased their fluorescence by 5.2-fold. The changes in fluorescence signal were proportionate and comparable against conventional NO assays. Rabbit blood samples immediately exposed to [Ru(bpy)2(dabpy)]2+ displayed 8-fold higher mean fluorescence, relative to blood without sensor. Approximately 14% of the observed signal was NO/NO adduct-specific. Optimal readings were obtained when sensor was added to freshly collected blood, remaining stable during subsequent freeze-thaw cycles. Clinical studies are now required to test the utility of [Ru(bpy)2(dabpy)]2+ as a sensor to detect changes in NO from human blood samples in cardiovascular health and disease.
Rights: © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
RMID: 0030108166
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-39123-3
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/CE140100003
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1111630
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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