Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/124446
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Type: Journal article
Title: Ask PCOS: identifying need to inform evidence-based app development for polycystic ovary syndrome
Author: Boyle, J.
Xu, R.
Gilbert, E.
Kuczynska-Burggraf, M.
Tan, B.
Teede, H.
Vincent, A.
Gibson-Helm, M.
Citation: Seminars in Reproductive Medicine, 2018; 36(1):59-65
Publisher: Thieme Medical Publishers
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 1526-8004
1526-4564
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jacqueline A. Boyle, Rebecca Xu, Emily Gilbert, Millicent Kuczynska-Burggraf, Bryan Tan, ... Helena Teede ... et al.
Abstract: BACKGROUND:People are increasingly seeking health information and managing their health through electronic technologies. We aimed to determine if women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) identified a need for PCOS-related mobile health apps and to evaluate related apps currently available. DESIGN:A national survey of women and a review of apps available on the iOS and Android platforms. SETTING:Community recruitment in Australia in 2016 and review of mobile apps available in 2017. SAMPLE:The survey received 264 responses. Sixteen apps related to PCOS were evaluated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Survey: Women's likeliness to use mobile health apps, specifically a PCOS-related app and preferred features of apps. App review: Mapping of available apps and evaluation using the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS). RESULTS:Of 264 respondents, almost all women had a smartphone (98%), 72% had previously used an app to manage their health, and most (91%) would use a PCOS-specific app if available. The most important feature was the availability of current, evidence-based information. Current apps on PCOS lack provision of quality information. CONCLUSION:Women with PCOS would use a PCOS-specific app of good quality that responds to their needs and facilitates self-care; however, currently available apps are unlikely to meet their information needs.
Keywords: polycystic ovary syndrome; information-seeking behavior; mobile health
Rights: © 2018 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.
RMID: 0030113626
DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1667187
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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