Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/13258
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Type: Journal article
Title: Inhibition of polyamine synthesis alters hair follicle function and fiber composition
Author: Hynd, P.
Nancarrow, M.
Citation: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 1996; 106(2):249-253
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 1996
ISSN: 0022-202X
1523-1747
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Philip I Hynd and Michelle J Nancarrow
Abstract: The activities of ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, two of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of the polyamines, were found to he high in follicle-rich homogenates of sheep skin, and to be responsive to the nutrition of the animal. Systemic provision of the inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, a-difiuoromethylornithine, markedly altered the length, diameter, and composition of the fiber, the last being accompanied by an increase in the proportion of the fiber occupied by paracorticai cells and an increase in the level of mRNA encoding a cysteine-rich family of keratin proteins. The growth of wool follicles cultured in media containing alpha-difluoromethylornithine was not inhibited, even at high concentrations. In contrast, low concentrations of methylglyoxal (bis)guanylhydrazone, the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, completely inhibited fiber growth in cultured follicles. Addition of spermidine to the media overcame this inhibition but spermine had no effect. Further evidence that spermine is not required for normal follicle function was provided by incubating follicles with the specific inhibitor of spermine synthase, n-butyl-l,3-diaminopropane. This inhibitor, even at high concentrations, had no effect on fiber growth in vitro. Spermidine partially overcame the growth depression that occurred in follicles cultured in methionine-deficient media, suggesting that part of the requirement for methionine is for spermidine synthesis in the follicle. These investigations provide strong evidence that the polyamines in general, and spermidine in particular, play a major role in hair growth.
Keywords: Decarboxylases; putrescine; spermidlne; spermine
Rights: © 1996 by Society for Investigative Dermatology, Inc.
RMID: 0030003770
DOI: 10.1111/1523-1747.ep12340634
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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