Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/132787
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dc.contributor.authorGhorbani, Z.-
dc.contributor.authorPeres, M.-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, P.-
dc.contributor.authorMejia, G.-
dc.contributor.authorArmfield, J.-
dc.contributor.authorPeres, K.-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationAustralian Dental Journal, 2017; 62(4):493-499-
dc.identifier.issn0045-0421-
dc.identifier.issn1834-7819-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2440/132787-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the association between early-life family income and dental pain experience from childhood to early adulthood.Data came from a 14-year prospective study (1991/1992-2005/2006) carried out in South Australia, which included children and adolescents aged 4-17 years (N = 9875) at baseline. The outcome was dental pain experience obtained at baseline, 14 years later in adulthood and at a middle point of time. The main explanatory variable was early-life family income collected at baseline.The prevalence of dental pain was 22.8% at baseline, 19.3% at 'middle time' and 39.3% at follow up. The proportion of people classified as 'poor' at baseline was 27.7%. Being poor early in life was significantly associated with dental pain at 14-year follow up (odds ratio = 1.45; 95% confidence interval = 1.27-1.66).Early-life relative poverty is associated with more frequent dental pain across the 14-year follow up and may be a key exposure variable for later dental conditions.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityZ. Ghorbani, M. A. Peres, P. Liu, G.C. Mejia, J. M. Armfield, K. G. Peres-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherWiley Online Library-
dc.rights© 2017 Australian Dental Association.-
dc.source.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adj.12531-
dc.subjectDental pain-
dc.subjectgeneralized estimating equation-
dc.subjectlife-course epidemiology-
dc.subjectlongitudinal studies-
dc.subjectsocioeconomic factors-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshToothache-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factors-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshIncome-
dc.subject.meshSouth Australia-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.titleDoes early-life family income influence later dental pain experience? A prospective 14-year study-
dc.typeJournal article-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/adj.12531-
dc.relation.grantNHMRC-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
dc.identifier.orcidPeres, M. [0000-0002-8329-2808]-
dc.identifier.orcidMejia, G. [0000-0003-2189-3525]-
dc.identifier.orcidArmfield, J. [0000-0001-7962-7559] [0000-0002-3223-8860]-
dc.identifier.orcidPeres, K. [0000-0002-1730-2123]-
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