Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/13522
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Type: Journal article
Title: Efficient plant regeneration system for immature embryos of triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack)
Author: Ainsley, Phillip John
Aryan, Arun Prakash
Citation: Plant Growth Regulation, 1998; 24 (1):23-30
Publisher: Springer
Issue Date: 1998
Abstract: A range of tissue culture conditions were tested to improve embryo culture frequency, and to develop an efficient plant regeneration system for triticale. Immature embryos (14–21 days post-anthesis) from two triticale genotypes (Hx87-139 and Tahara) were cultured on a commonly used Murashige and Skoog (MS) and on Lazzeri's (L1) basal medium with varied carbon sources, and two different plant growth regulators; 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 3,6-Dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (dicamba). Although embryos could be cultured on both media types, L1 based medium was better than MS basal salts for callus induction and somatic embryogenesis, with plant regeneration frequencies up to 11 fold greater on L1 media types. In the presence of dicamba, callus induction was more rapid, that resulted in subsequent regeneration of up to 2 fold more plantlets than from callus induced on medium containing 2,4-D. Maltose appeared to be a superior carbon source during differentiation of callus. Genotype Tahara showed a better regenerative response than Hx87-138, with up to 23 normal, fertile plants being produced from a single embryo when cultured on L1MDic medium, containing maltose (5%) and dicamba (20 mg l⁻¹). Applications of this tissue culture procedure in triticale improvement through genetic engineering are also discussed.
Keywords: Carbon source; embryo culture; growth regulators; plant regeneration; somatic embryogenesis; triticale
DOI: 10.1023/A:1005980410397
Published version: http://www.springerlink.com/content/lt4m1qp39183u15j/
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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