Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/16811
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Type: Journal article
Title: Antibiotic prophylaxis for dentoalveolar surgery: is it indicated?
Author: Lawler, B.
Sambrook, P.
Goss, A.
Citation: Australian Dental Journal, 2005; 50(S2):S54-S59
Publisher: Australian Dental Association
Issue Date: 2005
ISSN: 0045-0421
1834-7819
Statement of
Responsibility: 
B Lawler, PJ Sambrook, AN Goss
Abstract: Usually dentists in Australia give patients oral antibiotics after dentoalveolar surgery as a prophylaxis against wound infection. When this practice is compared to the principle of antibiotic prophylaxis in major surgery it is found to be at variance in a number of ways. In major surgery, the risk of infection should be high, and the consequences of infection severe or catastrophic, before antibiotic prophylaxis is ordered. If it is provided then a high dose of an appropriate spectrum antibiotic must be present in the blood prior to the first incision. Other factors which need to be considered are the degree of tissue trauma, the extent of host compromise, other medical comorbidities and length of hospitalization. Standardized protocols of administration have been determined and evaluated for most major surgical procedures. Dentoalveolar surgery is undoubtedly a skilled and technically challenging procedure. However, in contrast to major surgical procedures, it has a less than five per cent infection rate and rarely has severe adverse consequences. Dentoalveolar surgery should be of short duration with minimal tissue damage and performed in the dental chair under local anaesthesia. Controlled studies for both mandibular third molar surgery and placement of dental implants show little or no evidence of benefit from antibiotic prophylaxis and there is an adverse risk from the antibiotic. This review concludes that there is no case for antibiotic prophylaxis for most dentoalveolar surgery in fit patients. In the few cases where it can be considered, a single high preoperative dose should be given.
Keywords: Antibiotic prophylaxis; dentoalveolar surgery; infection
Description: The document attached has been archived with permission from the Australian Dental Association. An external link to the publisher’s copy is included.
RMID: 0020051699
DOI: 10.1111/j.1834-7819.2005.tb00387.x
Published version: http://www.ada.org.au/App_CmsLib/Media/Lib/0612/M32746_v1_633009162241038750.pdf
Appears in Collections:Dentistry publications

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