Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/17021
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Type: Journal article
Title: Reliability of the Service Need Assessment Profile (SNAP): A measure of support for people with disabilities
Author: Guscia, R.
Harries, J.
Kirby, N.
Nettelbeck, T.
Taplin, J.
Citation: Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 2005; 30(1):24-30
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Ltd
Issue Date: 2005
ISSN: 1366-8250
1469-9532
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Roma Guscia, Julia Harries, Neil Kirby, Ted Nettelbeck and John Taplin
Abstract: Background: Measures for estimating costs associated with the provision of disability services in Australia have not previously been available. Because such instruments are scarce worldwide, decisions about funding services have relied more on historical precedent and less on individual need. Recognising the necessity for an objective measure, Gould (1998) developed the Service Need Assessment Profile (SNAP), a scale for estimating the support needs and associated costs for people with disabilities. Method: This study examined the technical properties of SNAP using assessment data from 318 adults (190 males and 128 females), mean age 43 years, with a range of disability types and levels of severity, residing in supported accommodation around metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia. Results: Results suggest that SNAP's reliability varies across different sub-groups and across domains. Conclusion: Using SNAP assessments as a method for allocating funds/resources across the disability sector should be approached cautiously, bearing in mind the reported limitations.
Keywords: Disability; Inclusion and Special Educational Needs; Rehabilitation; Specific Learning Difficulties
Description: Copyright © 2005 Australiasian Society for the Study of Intellectual Disability Inc.
RMID: 0020050386
DOI: 10.1080/13668250500033144
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

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