Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/22642
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dc.contributor.authorJamieson, L.en
dc.contributor.authorArmfield, J.en
dc.contributor.authorRoberts-Thomson, K.en
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Public Health Dentistry, 2006; 66(2):123-130en
dc.identifier.issn0022-4006en
dc.identifier.issn1752-7325en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/22642-
dc.descriptionThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the role of location in Indigenous and non-Indigenous child oral health in three Australian states and territories. The Association of Indigenous status and residential location with caries prevalence, severity and unmet treatment need was examined. Methods: Data were collected as part of a national monitoring suivey of 4–14-year-old children enrolled in school dental services in New South Wales, South Australia and the Northern Territory, Australia. Results: Of the 326,099 children examined, 10,473 (3.2%) were Indigenous. Fewer 4–10-year-old rural Indigenous children were caries-free in the deciduous dentition than their non-Indigenous counterparts and rural Indigenous children had almost twice the mean number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (dmft) of rural non-Indigenous children. The % d/dmft was higher among rural Indigenous children than rural non-Indigenous children. Fewer 6–14-year-old rural Indigenous children were caries-free in the permanent dentition than their non-Indigenous counterparts and rural Indigenous children had almost twice the mean DMFT of rural non-Indigenous children. The % D/DMFT was higher in rural Indigenous than rural non-Indigenous children. Living in a rural location was the strongest indicator of canes prevalence, severity and unmet treatment need in the deciduous dentition of Indigenous 4–0-year-olds while being Socially disadvantaged was the strongest indicator of poor oral health outcomes among older indigenous and all non-Indigenous children. Conclusions: Living in a rural location exhibited the strongest Association with poor oral health outcomes for young Indigenous children but was also Associated with poorer oral health among older Indigenous and non-Indigenous children.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityLisa M. Jamieson, Jason M. Armfield and Kaye F. Roberts-Thomsonen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAAPHD National Officeen
dc.subjectchildren; dental caries; indigenous; locationen
dc.titleThe role of location in indigenous and non-indigenous child oral healthen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020060627en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1752-7325.2006.tb02567.xen
dc.identifier.pubid52848-
pubs.library.collectionDentistry publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidJamieson, L. [0000-0001-9839-9280]en
dc.identifier.orcidRoberts-Thomson, K. [0000-0001-7084-5541]en
Appears in Collections:Dentistry publications

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