Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/28782
Type: Conference paper
Title: Preliminary identification of flow regimes in a mechanically oscillated planar jet
Author: Riese, M.
Nathan, G.
Kelso, R.
Citation: Proceedings of the Fifteenth Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, 13-17 December, 2004 / M. Behnia, W. Li and G.D. McBain (eds.): AFMC00055, 4p. [CD-ROM]
Publisher: The University of Sydney
Publisher Place: CD-ROM
Issue Date: 2004
ISBN: 1864876956
Conference Name: Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (15th : 2004 : Sydney, Australia)
Abstract: A plate with a large aspect ratio nozzle was mechanically oscillated in a near sinusoidal fashion with three ratios of oscillation stroke to nozzle diameter, namely 10, 5 and 2.5. A set of 210 different flow conditions was investigated in the laminar Reynolds number regime and visualized utilizing both the hydrogen bubble and dye trace technique. Three flow regimes were identified with the transition between them being dependent on a Strouhal number based on oscillation stroke, which is equivalent to a relative velocity ration of the plate to the jet [V]/U. The first regime identified occurs in the highset velocity ratio region and has been termed the Wall Vortex regime. Here a vortex detaches from the jet at the end of each stroke and stays attached to the plate. A second flow regime, termed the Mushroom Vortex regime exists at lower velocity ratios. Here a counter-rotating vortex pair forms within the jet at the end of each stroke. The third regime is called the Weaving Jet regime. There the jet is ejected approximately normal to the plate but exhibits large-scale oscillations further downstream. All regimes were recorded and half sequences are presented here.
RMID: 0020041606
Published version: http://www.aeromech.usyd.edu.au/15afmc/proceedings/papers/AFMC00055.pdf
Appears in Collections:Mechanical Engineering conference papers
Environment Institute Leaders publications

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