Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/29193
Type: Conference paper
Title: A boundary layer growth model for one-dimensional turbulent unsteady pipe friction
Author: Lambert, M.
Vitkovsky, J.
Simpson, A.
Bergant, A.
Citation: Proceedings of the 14th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, 9-14 December, 2001 / B.B. Dally (ed.): pp.929–932
Publisher: 14th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, Dept of Mechanical Engineering, Adelaide University
Publisher Place: Adelaide
Issue Date: 2001
Conference Name: Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference (14th : 2001 : Adelaide, Australia)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
MF Lambert, JP Vítkovský, AR Simpson & A Bergant
Abstract: Unsteady flow in pipe networks is efficiently modelled using a one-dimensional flow approximation. It is general practice in engineering to assume a quasi-steady state approximation of the friction for unsteady pipe flows. The result of this approximation is an under-estimation of the damping during fast transient events. To remedy this shortcoming, an unsteady friction model is often employed. Unsteady friction models for laminar flow can be theoretically determined and have been successfully used for many years. However, the same cannot be said for unsteady friction in turbulent flows. A number of empirical unsteady friction models have been formulated, but only perform well for certain unsteady transient event types. This paper presents a new unsteady friction model for turbulent flows based on the growth and destruction of the boundary layer during a transient event.
Rights: © 2001 14th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, Adelaide University
RMID: 0020011804
Published version: http://www.afms.org.au/proceedings/14%20AFMC%20TOC.htm
Appears in Collections:Civil and Environmental Engineering publications
Environment Institute publications

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