Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/36802
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Type: Journal article
Title: Was there a second adaptive radiation of giant tortoises in the Indian Ocean? Using mitochondrial DNA to investigate speciation and biogeography of Aldabrachelys (Reptilia Testudinidae)
Author: Austin, J.
Arnold, E.
Bour, R.
Citation: Molecular Ecology, 2003; 12(6):1415-1424
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Issue Date: 2003
ISSN: 0962-1083
1365-294X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Austin, Jeremy J., Arnold, E. Nicholas and Bour, Roger
Abstract: A radiation of five species of giant tortoises (Cylindraspis) existed in the southwest Indian Ocean, on the Mascarene islands, and another (of Aldabrachelys) has been postulated on small islands north of Madagascar, from where at least eight nominal species have been named and up to five have been recently recognized. Of 37 specimens of Madagascan and small-island Aldabrachelys investigated by us, 23 yielded significant portions of a 428-base-pair (bp) fragment of mitochondrial (cytochrome b and tRNA-Glu), including type material of seven nominal species (A. arnoldi, A. dussumieri, A. hololissa, A. daudinii, A. sumierei, A. ponderosa and A. gouffei). These and nearly all the remaining specimens, including 15 additional captive individuals sequenced previously, show little variation. Thirty-three exhibit no differences and the remainder diverge by only 1–4 bp (0.23–0.93%). This contrasts with more widely accepted tortoise species which show much greater inter- and intraspecific differences. The non-Madagascan material examined may therefore only represent a single species and all specimens may come from Aldabra where the common haplotype is known to occur. The present study provides no evidence against the Madagascan origin for Aldabra tortoises suggested by a previous molecular phylogenetic analysis, the direction of marine currents and phylogeography of other reptiles in the area. Ancient mitochondrial DNA from the extinct subfossil A. grandidieri of Madagascar differs at 25 sites (5.8%) from all other Aldabrachelys samples examined here.
Keywords: Animals; Turtles; DNA, Mitochondrial; DNA Primers; Adaptation, Biological; Evolution, Molecular; Species Specificity; Movement; Geography; Indian Ocean; Genetic Variation
Description: The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
RMID: 0020065729
DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-294X.2003.01842.x
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications
Australian Centre for Ancient DNA publications
Environment Institute Leaders publications

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