Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/43353
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dc.contributor.authorJamieson, L.en
dc.contributor.authorArmfield, J.en
dc.contributor.authorRoberts-Thomson, K.en
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dental Health, 2007; 24(4):238-246en
dc.identifier.issn0265-539Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/43353-
dc.description.abstractObjective To examine trends in dental caries among indigenous and non-indigenous children in an Australian territory. Basic Research Design Routinely-collected data from a random selection of 6- and 12-year-old indigenous and non-indigenous children enrolled in the Northern Territory School Dental Service from 1989–2000 were obtained. The association of indigenous status with caries prevalence (percent dmft or DMFT>0 and percent dmft>3 or DMFT>1), caries severity (mean dmft or DMFT) and treatment need (percent d/dmft or D/DMFT) was examined. Results Results were obtained for 10,687 6- and 12-year old indigenous children and 21,777 6- and 12year-old non-indigenous children from 1989–2000. Across all years, indigenous 6-year-olds had higher caries prevalence in the deciduous dentition, greater mean dmft and percent d/dmft, and indigenous 12-year-olds had greater percent D/DMFT than their non-indigenous counterparts (p<0.05). From 1996–2000 the mean dmft and percent d/dmft for indigenous 6-year-olds and mean DMFT and percent D/DMFT for indigenous 12-year-olds increased, yet remained relatively constant for their non-indigenous counterparts (p<0.05). From 1997–2000, the percent dmft>3 for 6-year-old indigenous children was more than double that of non-indigenous children, while across the period 1994–2000, indigenous 6-year-old mean dmft was more than double that of their non-indigenous counterparts (p<0.05). Conclusions Indigenous children in our study experienced consistently poorer oral health than non-indigenous children. The severity of dental caries among indigenous children, particularly in the deciduous dentition, appears to be increasing while that of non-indigenous children has remained constant. Our findings suggest that indigenous children carry a disproportionate amount of the dental caries burden among Northern Territory 6- and 12-year-olds.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityL.M. Jamieson, J.M. Armfield and K.F. Roberts-Thomsonen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherF D I World Dental Press Ltden
dc.rights© BASCD 2007en
dc.source.urihttp://www.cdhjournal.org/view.php?article_id=38&journal_id=6en
dc.subjectChildren; dental caries; indigenous; trendsen
dc.titleDental caries trends among indigenous and non-indigenous Australian childrenen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020074534en
dc.identifier.pubid46307-
pubs.library.collectionDentistry publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidJamieson, L. [0000-0001-9839-9280]en
dc.identifier.orcidArmfield, J. [0000-0001-7962-7559]en
dc.identifier.orcidRoberts-Thomson, K. [0000-0001-7084-5541]en
Appears in Collections:Dentistry publications

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