Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/43656
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dc.contributor.authorDoolan, C.en
dc.contributor.authorCotton, F.en
dc.contributor.authorGalbraith, R.en
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Helicopter Society, 2001; 46(3):221-227en
dc.identifier.issn0002-8711en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/43656-
dc.description.abstractExperiments were performed where a blade of symmetrical pro le was placed one chord upstream of another blade of identical dimensions but installed with miniature pressure transducers around the chord. The purpose of such a test was to simulate the e ect of multiple orthogonal vortex interactions which may occur within the tail rotors of helicopters. It was found that when the upstream blade was installed, the pressure response experienced by the instrumented blade was similar in form but reduced in magnitude by 50% compared with results obtained without the upstream blade. This indicates that the vortex has the ability to reconnect and re-establish rotational and axial components after an initial cut. It also implies that noise and vibration radiating from tail rotors may be produced from multiple `cuts' of the same vortex.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityC. J. Doolan, F. N. Coton and R. A. McD. Galbraithzen
dc.description.urihttp://www.vtol.org/journal/ji01-04.htmlen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmer Helicopter Soc Incen
dc.source.urihttps://vtol.org/store/product/the-effect-of-a-preceding-blade-on-the-orthogonal-vortex-interaction-4765.cfmen
dc.titleThe Effect of a Preceding Blade on the Orthogonal Vortex Interactionen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020076809en
dc.identifier.pubid44694-
pubs.library.collectionMechanical Engineering publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
Appears in Collections:Mechanical Engineering publications
Environment Institute publications

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