Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/50791
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Type: Journal article
Title: Eosinophilic fasciitis as a paraneoplastic phenomenon associated with metastatic colorectal carcinoma
Author: Philpott, H.
Hissaria, P.
Warren, L.
Singhal, N.
Brown, M.
Proudman, S.
Cleland, L.
Gillis, D.
Citation: Australasian Journal of Dermatology, 2008; 49(1):27-29
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Asia
Issue Date: 2008
ISSN: 0004-8380
1440-0960
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Hamish Philpott, Pravin Hissaria, Lachlan Warrren, Nimit Singhal, Michael Brown, Susanna Proudman, Les Cleland and David Gillis
Abstract: A 72-year-old man presented with erythema and induration of his calves and forearms. He had a past history of stage 1 colorectal carcinoma, treated with resection and primary anastamosis 4 years earlier. A diagnosis of eosinophilic fasciitis was made based on the characteristic clinical appearance, peripheral blood eosinophilia and a skin biopsy. There was no improvement in the condition following treatment with prednisolone or methotrexate. One year later, abnormal liver function studies were noted, and an abdominal computed tomography scan and subsequent needle biopsy of the liver confirmed a neoplastic lesion in the liver consistent with a metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Systemic chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and capecitabine was commenced, and resulted in partial remission of the colorectal carcinoma. Simultaneously, the indurations of the forearms and calves also improved, suggesting that the eosinophilic fasciitis was a paraneoplastic phenomenon.
Keywords: Skin; Humans; Adenocarcinoma; Colorectal Neoplasms; Liver Neoplasms; Paraneoplastic Syndromes; Fasciitis; Eosinophilia; Aged; Male
Description: The definitive version may be found at www.wiley.com Copyright © 2008 The Authors
RMID: 0020080040
DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-0960.2007.00415
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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