Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/56559
Type: Conference paper
Title: Difference as a resource for sustainable agricultural development: Responding to the globalization of modern agriculture by supporting local agrobiodiversity
Author: Bardsley, D.
Citation: Proceedings of the 18th International Symposium of the International Farming Systems Association: A Global Learning Opportunity, 2005: pp.13-20
Publisher: International Farming Systems Association
Publisher Place: Rome, Italy
Issue Date: 2005
Conference Name: International Symposium & Global Learning Opportunity (18th : 2005 : Rome, Italy)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Douglas Bardsley
Abstract: The dominant modernisation approach to agricultural development fails to sufficiently value the diversity that exists within social and ecological systems because of the need to maximise short-term goals of profitability and productivity. While there are substantial advantages inherent with the increasing interconnectedness and mutual responsibility associated with globalization, it is vital that an inability of the modernisation approach to incorporate the diversity of societies is recognised. Significant risks are apparent for all small-scale farming systems, particularly in relation to changes in climatic and market conditions. Examples are drawn from the researcher's work in Nepal, Turkey and Switzerland to outline the scope of opportunities that emerging for small farmers. In particular, an alternative evolving Human Ecology paradigm focusing on the multifunctional values of agriculture, including the inherent value of difference between and within agricultural systems, provides a framework by which economic development is being redefined within local contexts of social and ecological sustainability.
RMID: 0020092515
Description (link): http://www.fao.org/farmingsystems/ifsa_symposium_en.htm
Appears in Collections:Geography, Environment and Population publications

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