Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/5692
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Type: Journal article
Title: Brain tumours in infancy : a clinicopathological study
Author: Hanieh, S.
Hanieh, A.
Bourne, A.
Byard, R.
Citation: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 1997; 4(2):181-185
Publisher: Pearson Professional Ltd
Issue Date: 1997
ISSN: 0967-5868
1532-2653
Statement of
Responsibility: 
S Hanieh, A Hanieh, A.J Bourne and R.W Byard
Abstract: To investigate the clinicopathological features of brain tumours occurring in the first year of life, the records of the Department of Histopathology at the Adelaide Children's Hospital were examined for cases where the initial diagnosis of intracranial neoplasm had been made in infancy. Surgical material was available for review from 1972 to 1993 and autopsy cases were reviewed for an additional 12 years from 1962 to 1993. Twenty-four infants with intracranial neoplasms were diagnosed ranging in age from 5 days to 1 year (average = 7 months). There were 23 surgical cases and 1 autopsy case. The male to female ratio was 17:7. Fifty-eight percent of the tumours were located in the supratentorial region. Although the incidence is relatively low, this study demonstrates that a wide range of brain tumours, which differ significantly in both clinical presentation and location from those found in the older child, do occur during the first year of life. The location of the primary tumour may be affected by associated congenital malformations, and metastatic malignancy, although rare, may occur. Antenatal ultrasound examination may be useful in identifying congenital intracranial tumours.
Keywords: brain tumour; infancy; metastasis
Rights: Copyright © 1997 Pearson Professional Ltd.
RMID: 0030006169
DOI: 10.1016/S0967-5868(97)90071-0
Appears in Collections:Pathology publications

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