Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/63536
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Type: Journal article
Title: Rethinking oil depletion: what role can cycling really play in dispersed cities?
Author: Burke, M.
Bonham, J.
Citation: Australian Planner, 2010; 47(4):272-283
Publisher: Royal Australian Planning Institute Inc
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0729-3682
2150-6841
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Matthew Ian Burke and Jennifer Bonham
Abstract: What is the role of cycling in dispersed cities under Peak Oil? This research sought to appraise the bicycle's mitigating potential in an oil crisis, and to identify the specific ways planners may respond to maximise these effects. An overview of cycling in dispersed cities, focused on US and Australian cities, highlights low bicycle mode shares and low participation rates for women, children and seniors at present. Yet cycling can flourish in suburban settings, with low-density, outer-suburban communities in many European cities having very high bicycle mode shares, and strong participation across all demographic groups. Under a variety of Peak Oil scenarios, the bicycle is shown to play specific roles in supplying local mobility and access to and from mass public transport for longer distance trips. In conjunction with minor urban restructuring and public transport networking, many suburban areas could still function without reliance on large quantities of oil for access and mobility. Planning priorities include cycle network planning, ensuring current infrastructures can meet demand, links to public transport and end-of-trip facilities, and socio-cultural research into suburban bicycle sub-markets to better inform targeted behaviour change interventions.
Rights: © 2010 Planning Institute Australia
RMID: 0020105148
DOI: 10.1080/07293682.2010.527291
Appears in Collections:Geography, Environment and Population publications
Centre for Housing, Urban and Regional Planning publications

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