Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/63629
Type: Journal article
Title: Australian Indigenous Peoples and Biodiversity
Author: Nursey-Bray, M.
Hill, R.
Citation: Social Alternatives, 2010; 29(3):13-19
Publisher: Social Alternatives
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0155-0306
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Melissa Nursey-Bray and Rosemary Hill
Abstract: Indigenous peoples’ cultural practices have influenced biodiversity patterns over millennia, and they continue to control many high conservation-value biodiversity areas. In Australia, initiatives such as Indigenous Protected Areas and co-management programs are engaging Indigenous people in biodiversity management in recognition that such collaboration is likely to improve the health of landscapes and biodiversity. Nevertheless, Indigenous peoples worldwide live in conditions of poverty and exhibit lower levels of health than others, which pose risks to biodiversity conservation. However, Indigenous engagement in biodiversity management activities is also associated with better human health, including lowered rates of diabetes and cardio-vascular disease. We argue that Indigenous engagement in biodiversity management is mandated from triple principles of conservation, social justice and democracy that recognise the importance of benefits for people. Indigenous-biodiversity engagements developed from these principles give greater emphasis to Indigenous governance. Such biodiversity management mandated from social justice is a more diverse and rich experience and may also bring better conservation outcomes.
Rights: Copyright of Social Alternatives is the property of Social Alternatives and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission.
RMID: 0020104174
Appears in Collections:Geography, Environment and Population publications
Centre for Housing, Urban and Regional Planning publications

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