Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/64521
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Neospora caninum-like oocysts observed in feces of free-ranging red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and coyotes (Canis latrans)
Author: Wapenaar, W.
Jenkins, M.
O'Handley, R.
Barkema, H.
Citation: Journal of Parasitology, 2006; 92(6):1270-1274
Publisher: Amer Soc Parasitologists
Issue Date: 2006
ISSN: 0022-3395
1937-2345
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Wendela Wapenaar, Mark C. Jenkins, Ryan M. O’Handley and Herman W. Barkema
Abstract: The aim of this study was to examine the feces of free-ranging foxes and coyotes for the presence of Neospora caninum oocysts. Feces were collected from 271 foxes and 185 coyotes in the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island, processed by sucrose flotation, and examined by light microscopy for the presence of coccidian oocysts. In 2 fox and 2 coyote samples, oocysts morphologically and morphometrically similar to oocysts of N. caninum were observed. DNA was extracted from these samples and subjected to nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers to the N. caninum–specific Nc5 genomic sequence. Through DNA sequencing, alignment of the sequences of at least 3 clones from each isolate to sequences deposited in GenBank revealed 95–99% similarity to the Nc5 sequence of N. caninum. PCR using primers specific for Hammondia heydorni failed to yield an amplification product from these DNA samples.
Keywords: Feces; Animals; Coyotes; Foxes; Neospora; Oocysts; Coccidiosis; DNA, Protozoan; Antibodies, Protozoan; Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect; Parasite Egg Count; Cloning, Molecular; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Sequence Alignment; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Molecular Sequence Data; Prince Edward Island; Female; Male
Rights: © American Society of Parasitologists 2006
RMID: 0020108657
DOI: 10.1645/GE-913R.1
Appears in Collections:Animal and Veterinary Sciences publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.