Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/68819
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Type: Journal article
Title: Antimicrobial use in the Australian pig industry -results of a national survey
Author: Jordan, D.
Chin, J.
Fahy, V.
Barton, M.
Smith, M.
Trott, D.
Citation: Australian Veterinary Journal, 2009; 87(6):222-229
Publisher: Australian Veterinary Assn
Issue Date: 2009
ISSN: 0005-0423
1751-0813
Statement of
Responsibility: 
D. Jordan, J. J-C Chin, V. A Fahy, M. D Barton, M. G Smith and D. J Trott
Abstract: Objective To describe how various antimicrobials are used in commercial pig herds in Australia and for what disease conditions. Procedure Managers of large pig herds (> 200 sows) across Australia and their veterinarians participated in an internet-based survey in 2006. Questions were asked about herd management, the occurrence of bacterial diseases and the type and frequency of antimicrobial use. An antimicrobial usage index for each herd was derived as a summary of the risk of selection for antimicrobial resistance. Relationships between responses were explored with univariate and multivariate analysis. Results Responses were received for 197 herds estimated to represent at least 51% of all large pig herds in Australia. Most piggeries relied on drugs of low importance in human medicine (e.g. tetracyclines, penicillins and sulfonamides). For the two drugs of high importance in human medicine that can be legally prescribed to pigs in Australia, ceftiofur use was reported in 25% of herds and virginiamycin in none. Infections attributed to Lawsonia, Mycoplasma and Escherichia coli motivated the most use of antimicrobials. No useful association was found between management factors and the antimicrobial use index. Conclusion Most antimicrobial use in the Australian pig industry is based on drugs of low importance to public health. Enhanced control of E. coli infections without reliance on antimicrobials would further reduce the risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistance relevant to public health. The amount of variation in the usage index between herds suggests that antimicrobial use should be constantly reviewed on a herd by herd basis.
Keywords: antibiotics; antimicrobials; pigs; surveys
Rights: © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Australian Veterinary Association.Copyright © 1999–2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
RMID: 0020106699
DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-0813.2009.00430.x
Appears in Collections:Animal and Veterinary Sciences publications

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