Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/80218
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Elevated maternal lipids in early pregnancy are not associated with risk of intrapartum caesarean in overweight and obese nulliparous women
Author: Fyfe, E.
Rivers, K.
Thompson, J.
Thiyagarajan, K.
Groom, K.
Dekker, G.
McCowan, L.
Citation: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 2013; 13(143):1-7
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 1471-2393
1471-2393
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Elaine M Fyfe, Karen S Rivers, John MD Thompson, Kamala PL Thiyagarajan, Katie M Groom, Gustaaf A Dekker, Lesley ME McCowan and On behalf of the SCOPE consortium
Abstract: Background: Maternal overweight and obesity are associated with slower labour progress and increased caesarean delivery for failure to progress. Obesity is also associated with hyperlipidaemia and cholesterol inhibits myometrial contractility in vitro. Our aim was, among overweight and obese nulliparous women, to investigate 1. the role of early pregnancy serum cholesterol and 2. clinical risk factors associated with first stage caesarean for failure to progress at term. Methods: Secondary data analysis from a prospective cohort of overweight/obese New Zealand and Australian nullipara recruited to the SCOPE study. Women who laboured at term and delivered vaginally (n=840) or required first stage caesarean for failure to progress (n=196) were included. Maternal characteristics and serum cholesterol at 14–16 weeks’ of gestation were compared according to delivery mode in univariable and multivariable analyses (adjusted for BMI, maternal age and height, obstetric care type, induction of labour and gestation at delivery ≥41 weeks). Results: Total cholesterol at 14–16 weeks was not higher among women requiring first stage caesarean for failure to progress compared to those with vaginal delivery (5.55 ± 0.92 versus 5.67 ± 0.85 mmol/L, p= 0.10 respectively). Antenatal risk factors for first stage caesarean for failure to progress in overweight and obese women were BMI (adjusted odds ratio [aOR (95% CI)] 1.15 (1.07-1.22) per 5 unit increase, maternal age 1.37 (1.17-1.61) per 5 year increase, height 1.09 (1.06-1.12) per 1cm reduction), induction of labour 1.94 (1.38-2.73) and prolonged pregnancy ≥41 weeks 1.64 (1.14-2.35). Conclusions: Elevated maternal cholesterol in early pregnancy is not a risk factor for first stage caesarean for failure to progress in overweight/obese women. Other clinically relevant risk factors identified are: increasing maternal BMI, increasing maternal age, induction of labour and prolonged pregnancy ≥41 weeks’ of gestation.
Keywords: Cholesterol; Antenatal; Delivery; Obesity; Labour
Rights: © 2013 Fyfe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
RMID: 0020130780
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2393-13-143
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
hdl_80218.pdfPublished version226.86 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.