Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/8163
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Type: Journal article
Title: Management and monitoring of severe preeclampsia
Author: Bolte, A.
van Geijn, H.
Dekker, G.
Citation: European Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 2001; 96(1):8-20
Publisher: Elsevier Sci Ireland Ltd
Issue Date: 2001
ISSN: 0301-2115
1872-7654
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Antoinette C. Bolte, Herman P. van Geijn and Gustaaf A. Dekker
Abstract: Preeclampsia is associated with increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Preeclampsia is more than pregnancy-induced hypertension. The hypertension is only one manifestation of an underlying multifactorial, multisystem disorder, initiated early in pregnancy. In established severe disease there is volume contraction, reduced cardiac output, enhanced vascular reactivity, increased vascular permeability and platelet consumption. Medical treatment of severe hypertension in pregnancy is required. The more controversial issues are the role of pharmacological treatment in conservative management of severe preeclampsia aiming at prolongation of pregnancy, the ability of such therapy to modify the course of the underlying systemic disorder and the effects on fetal and maternal outcome. This paper presents an overview concerning the current developments in management and monitoring of severe preeclampsia. Controversial topics such as the role of plasma volume expansion in preeclampsia, expectant versus aggressive management of severe preeclampsia remote from term, and pharmacological interventions in the management of eclampsia and the HELLP syndrome are addressed.
Keywords: Preeclampsia; HELLP syndrome; Eclampsia; Conservative management
RMID: 0020012230
DOI: 10.1016/S0301-2115(00)00383-3
Description (link): http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03012115
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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