Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82228
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Type: Journal article
Title: Retrotransposons regulate host genes in mouse oocytes and preimplantation embryos
Author: Peaston, A.
Eviskov, A.
Graber, J.
de Vries, W.
Holbrook, A.
Soltor, D.
Knowles, B.
Citation: Developmental Cell, 2004; 7(4):597-606
Publisher: Cell Press
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 1534-5807
1878-1551
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Anne E. Peaston, Alexei V. Evsikov, Joel H. Graber, Wilhelmine N. de Vries, Andrea E. Holbrook, Davor Solter, and Barbara B. Knowles
Abstract: A comprehensive analysis of transposable element (TE) expression in mammalian full-grown oocytes reveals that LTR class III retrotransposons make an unexpectedly high contribution to the maternal mRNA pool, which persists in cleavage stage embryos. The most abundant transcripts in the mouse oocyte are from the mouse transcript (MT) retrotransposon family, and expression of this and other TE families is developmentally regulated. Furthermore, TEs act as alternative promoters and first exons for a subset of host genes, regulating their expression in full-grown oocytes and cleavage stage embryos. To our knowledge, this is the first example of TEs initiating synchronous, developmentally regulated expression of multiple genes in mammals. We propose that differential TE expression triggers sequential reprogramming of the embryonic genome during the oocyte to embryo transition and in preimplantation embryos.
Keywords: Oocytes; Blastocyst; Animals; Mice, Inbred Strains; Mice; Retroelements; Phylogeny; Transcription, Genetic; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental; Base Sequence; Terminal Repeat Sequences; Consensus Sequence; Embryonic Development; Pregnancy; Introns; Exons; Molecular Sequence Data; Female
Rights: Copyright ©2004 by Cell Press
RMID: 0020109851
DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2004.09.004
Appears in Collections:Animal and Veterinary Sciences publications

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