Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/8472
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Type: Journal article
Title: REDOX regulation of early embryo development
Author: Harvey, A.
Kind, K.
Thompson, J.
Citation: Reproduction, 2002; 123(4):479-486
Publisher: Journals of Reproduction Fertility Ltd
Issue Date: 2002
ISSN: 1470-1626
1741-7899
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Alexandra J. Harvey, Karen L. Kind and Jeremy G. Thompson
Abstract: Preimplantation embryonic development is associated with a change in preference in energy metabolism pathways. Although oxidative phosphorylation is obligatory in most species throughout preimplantation development, an increasing role for energy derived from glycolysis is associated with compaction and blastulation. Such a shift in metabolic pathway preference is desirable as the embryo faces an increasingly hypoxic environment in utero. We hypothesize that this shift in metabolic preference is associated with a change in the reduction–oxidation (REDOX) state within the embryo, affecting not only the energy production required for development, but also the activity of REDOX-sensitive transcription factors, which may alter gene expression patterns. Shifts in intracellular REDOX state may also contribute to spatial differences in cell activity, especially after compaction, and perhaps even major embryonic events such as fertilization, genome activation and cellular differentiation.
Keywords: Uterus; Intracellular Fluid; Blastocyst; Animals; Transcription Factors; Gene Expression; Energy Metabolism; Oxidation-Reduction; Oxidative Phosphorylation; Embryonic and Fetal Development; Gestational Age; Pregnancy; Female
Description: © 2002 Society for Reproduction and Fertility
RMID: 0020020766
DOI: 10.1530/rep.0.1230479
Published version: http://www.reproduction-online.org/cgi/content/abstract/123/4/479
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications
Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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