Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/85970
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Comparative responses to temperature of the major canopy species of Tasmanian cool temperate rainforest and their ecological significance. I. Foliar frost-resistance
Author: Read, J.
Hill, R.S.
Citation: Australian Journal of Botany, 1988; 36(2):131-143
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Issue Date: 1988
ISSN: 0067-1924
1444-9862
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jennifer Read and Robert S. Hill
Abstract: Foliar frost resistance has been determined using the conductivity method in the rainforest canopy species Nothofagus cunninghamii (Hook.) Oerst., Atherosperma moschatum Labill., Eucryphia lucida (Labill.) Bail]., Phyllocladus aspleniifolius (Labill.) Hook. f. and Athrotaxis selaginoides D. Don in glasshouse experiments and seasonal measurements at Mt Field National Park, Tasmania. Some determinations of frost resistance were also made in Lagarostrobos franklinii (Hook. f.) C. J. Quinn and Nothofagus gunnii (Hook. f.) Oerst. The general trend of foliar frost resistance is in the order A. moschatum < P. aspleniifolius < E. lucida < A. selaginoides < N. cunninghamii. This is consistent with the infrequency of A. moschatum at the higher altitudes, its occupation of the lower canopy in old rainforest and its infrequent establishment on exposed sites. P. aspleniifolius is more common at high altitudes than E. lucida but has a lower foliar frost resistance. A. selaginoides and N. cunninghamii have a high frost resistance consistent with their occurrence at high altitudes and on exposed sites. However, A. selaginoides does not have the superior frost resistance predicted by its occurrence at higher altitudes than N. cunninghamii. The leaves of N. gunnii (winter-deciduous) have a low summer frost resistance relative to the co-occurring evergreen species A. selaginoides and N. cunninghamii. L. franklinii has a higher frost resistance than predicted from its infrequent occurrence at high altitudes.
Rights: © CSIRO 1988
RMID: 0030009289
DOI: 10.1071/BT9880131
Appears in Collections:Ecology, Evolution and Landscape Science publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.