Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/87176
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dc.contributor.authorMejia, G.en
dc.contributor.authorJamieson, L.en
dc.contributor.authorHa, D.en
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, A.en
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Dental Research, 2014; 93(10):966-971en
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345en
dc.identifier.issn1544-0591en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/87176-
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to (1) describe social gradients in dental caries in a population-level survey and (2) examine whether inequalities are greater in disease experience or in its treatment. Using data from Australia's National Survey of Adult Oral Health 2004-2006, we examined absolute and relative income inequalities for DMFT and its separate components (DT, MT, FT) using adjusted proportions, means, and health disparity indices [Slope Index of Inequality (SII) and Relative Index of Inequality (RII)]. Approximately 90% of Australian adults had experienced caries, with prevalence ranging from 89.7% in the highest to 96.6% in the lowest income group. Social gradients in caries were evident across all components of DMFT, but particularly notable in Missing (SII = -15.5, RII = -0.3) and untreated Decay (SII = -23.7, RII = -0.9). Analysis of age- and gender-adjusted data indicated less variation in levels of disease experienced (DMFT) than in the health outcomes of its management (missing teeth). The findings indicate that social gradients for dental caries have a greater effect on how the disease was treated than on lifetime disease experience.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityG. Mejia, L.M. Jamieson, D. Ha, A.J. Spenceren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen
dc.rights© 2014 by International & American Associations for Dental Researchen
dc.subjectsocial differentials; dental caries; Absolute Concentration Index; Slope Index of Inequality; Relative Concentration Index; Relative Index of Inequalityen
dc.titleGreater inequalities in dental treatment than in disease experienceen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030014429en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0022034514545516en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/299060en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/349514en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/349537en
dc.identifier.pubid108116-
pubs.library.collectionDentistry publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS01en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidMejia, G. [0000-0003-2189-3525]en
dc.identifier.orcidJamieson, L. [0000-0001-9839-9280]en
dc.identifier.orcidHa, D. [0000-0002-5440-4452]en
Appears in Collections:Dentistry publications

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