Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/93083
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Type: Journal article
Title: How well do parental and peer relationships in adolescence predict health in adulthood?
Author: Landstedt, E.
Hammarström, A.
Winefield, H.
Citation: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 2015; 43(5):460-468
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 1403-4948
1651-1905
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Evelina Landstedt, Anne Hammarström, Helen Winefield
Abstract: Aim: Although health effects of social relationships are well-researched, long-term health consequences of adolescent family as well as peer relationships are poorly understood. The aim of the study was to explore the prospective importance of parental and peer social relationships in adolescence on internalising and functional somatic symptoms in adulthood. Methods: Data were drawn from four waves of the Northern Swedish Cohort Study, response rate 94.3%, N=1001. Outcome variables were internalising and functional somatic symptoms at the ages of 21, 30 and 42. Relationship variables at age 16 were poor parental contact and three indicators of poor peer relationships. Associations were assessed in multivariate ordinal logistic regressions with adjustment for confounders and baseline health. Results: Results show that the main relationships-related predictors of adult internalising symptoms were self-rated poor peer relationships in terms of spending time alone during after-school hours and poor parental relationship. Functional somatic symptoms on the other hand were most strongly associated with poor parental contact and not being happy with classmates at age 16.
Keywords: Mental health; psychosomatic health; longitudinal study; social integration; youth; cohort study; prediction; social relationships
Rights: © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health
RMID: 0030026339
DOI: 10.1177/1403494815576360
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

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