Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/93838
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Type: Journal article
Title: General anaesthetic considerations for haemostasis in orbital surgery
Author: Sia, D.
Chalmers, A.
Singh, V.
Malhotra, R.
Selva, D.
Citation: Orbit, 2014; 33(1):5-12
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 0167-6830
1744-5108
Statement of
Responsibility: 
David Ik Tuo Sia, Alison Chalmers, Varjeet Singh, Raman Malhotra & Dinesh Selva
Abstract: Orbital surgery is often conducted in areas with limited exposure where vital structures are tightly crowded together. A bloodless field is paramount in orbital surgery for the proper identification of normal and pathologic tissue and even minimal bleeding can obscure the surgical field, making surgery more difficult and increasing the risk of complications. Surgery for highly vascular orbital lesions is an additional situation where maintaining an adequate surgical field is often challenging but paramount. The role of the anaesthetist in controlling surgical blood loss has been increasingly recognized in the last few decades. Various techniques including hypotensive anaesthesia have been described, but the control of intraoperative bleeding does not rely on a single particular technique, but a series of well-designed interventions that result in optimal conditions. An understanding of the anaesthetic considerations pertinent to haemostasis is invaluable for oculoplastic surgeons. Additionally, with the growing use of endonasal approaches to medial wall decompression and accessing the medial orbit, it has become increasingly important that orbital surgeons understand the anaesthetic requirements of their colleagues in other disciplines.
Keywords: Anesthetics; Hemostasis; hypotensive anaesthesia; orbital surgery; oculoplastics
Rights: © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc
RMID: 0030015152
DOI: 10.3109/01676830.2013.842250
Appears in Collections:Opthalmology & Visual Sciences publications

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