Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/93932
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dc.contributor.authorO Connor, A.en
dc.contributor.authorDu, K.en
dc.contributor.authorRoos, G.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Intellectual Capital, 2015; 16(3):466-489en
dc.identifier.issn1469-1930en
dc.identifier.issn1758-7468en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/93932-
dc.description.abstractPurpose – Developed economies with high-cost environments face industrial transitions from scale-based manufacturing (MAN) to knowledge, technology and intangible asset-based sectors. The purpose of this paper is to examine the changes in employment and value-adding profiles of transitioning industry sectors in Australia and discuss the implications for policy that influences the intellectual capital (IC) profile of industrial sectors in transition. Design/methodology/approach – The approach borrowed concepts from the firm-level strategic management literature and applied them to a macro level of industry analysis. In this paper the authors examine the transitions in the Australian economy which, due to a rising cost base, is experiencing a decline in its value chain-oriented MAN sector. The authors contrast four industry sectors with the MAN sector and examine the different value creation models. Findings – The findings clearly show how the contribution to employment and value added (termed Economic Value Contribution ) of the different sectors vary. The authors extend these findings to a discussion on policy and the dimensions of IC that may have a role to play in facilitating transitions within an economy. The main conclusion is that a more rapid transition and higher value may be created if innovation and entrepreneurship are facilitated by targeted policies in transitioning sector. Research limitations/implications – This work is based on a single country analysis of selected industry sectors. Further work needs to be done across many more countries to contrast the findings across nations/regions that differ in industrial complexity and to refine the analytical framework to improve construct validity and increase analytical power. Practical implications – This work has implications for policy-makers facing the challenges of a transitioning economy, whether national or regional. Governments that are hands-on with respect to interventions to salvage and/or extend the life of sectors are at risk of missing opportunities to build the capacities and capabilities of emerging sectors while those governments that are hands-off, deferring to market mechanisms, risk transitions that are too little and/or too late to maintain a national or regional competitiveness. Originality/value – To the authors knowledge, this is the first attempt to integrate the specific firm-level strategic management perspectives, used in this paper, with the macro-policy level to examine industry sectors with the twin metrics of economic productivity and employment in transitioning economies.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityAllan O’Connor and Kai Du, Göran Roosen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.en
dc.rights© Emerald Group Publishing Limiteden
dc.subjectInnovation; Value analysis; Industrial revolution; Entrepreneurshipen
dc.titleThe intellectual capital needs of a transitioning economy: a case study exploration of Australian sectoral changesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030031939en
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JIC-08-2014-0097en
dc.identifier.pubid194296-
pubs.library.collectionEntrepreneurship, Commercialisation, and Innovation Centre publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS02en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
Appears in Collections:Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation, and Innovation Centre publications

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