Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/97372
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Type: Journal article
Title: Male labour migration, spousal communication, and STI treatment in Armenia
Author: Sevoyan, A.
Agadjanian, V.
Citation: Culture, Health and Sexuality, 2015; 17(3):296-311
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Issue Date: 2015
ISSN: 1369-1058
1464-5351
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Arusyak Sevoyan and Victor Agadjanian
Abstract: This study aims to add to the scant research on the association between labour migration and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It builds upon earlier findings suggesting that left-behind migrants' wives tend to have higher risks of contracting STIs than women married to non-migrants. Using data from a 2007 survey in rural Armenia, a post-Soviet patriarchal setting with high levels of seasonal male migration and high rates of STIs, we examine how migration influences spousal communication about STIs, and how this communication, in turn, affects women's use of medical care for STI-like symptoms. The results of random-intercept logistic regression models show that migrants' wives were significantly more likely to talk about STI-related risks with their husbands than were non-migrants' wives. However, among women reporting STI-like symptoms in 12 months before the survey, migrants' wives were less likely to have talked to their husbands about these symptoms. We also find that women married to migrants were less likely to seek professional care for their STI-like symptoms than those married to non-migrants, but this association was moderated by women's communication about these symptoms with their spouses.
Keywords: Sexually transmitted infections; help-seeking behaviour; migrants; communication; Armenia
Rights: © 2014 Taylor & Francis
RMID: 0030019427
DOI: 10.1080/13691058.2014.936042
Appears in Collections:Geography, Environment and Population publications

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