Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/57814
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Type: Journal article
Title: Genome sequence, comparative analysis, and population genetics of the domestic horse
Author: Wade, C.
Giulotto, E.
Sigurdsson, S.
Zoli, M.
Gnerre, S.
Imsland, F.
Lear, T.
Adelson, D.
Bailey, E.
Bellone, R.
Blocker, H.
Distl, O.
Edgar, R.
Garber, M.
Leeb, T.
Mauceli, E.
Macleod, J.
PENEDO, M.
Raison, J.
Sharpe, T.
et al.
Citation: Science, 2009; 326(5954):865-867
Publisher: Amer Assoc Advancement Science
Issue Date: 2009
ISSN: 0036-8075
1095-9203
Statement of
Responsibility: 
C. M. Wade... D. L. Adelson... J. M. Raison... et al.
Abstract: We report a high-quality draft sequence of the genome of the horse (Equus caballus). The genome is relatively repetitive but has little segmental duplication. Chromosomes appear to have undergone few historical rearrangements: 53% of equine chromosomes show conserved synteny to a single human chromosome. Equine chromosome 11 is shown to have an evolutionary new centromere devoid of centromeric satellite DNA, suggesting that centromeric function may arise before satellite repeat accumulation. Linkage disequilibrium, showing the influences of early domestication of large herds of female horses, is intermediate in length between dog and human, and there is long-range haplotype sharing among breeds.
Keywords: Broad Institute Genome Sequencing Platform; Broad Institute Whole Genome Assembly Team; Chromosomes, Mammalian; Centromere; Animals; Animals, Domestic; Dogs; Horses; Humans; Chromosome Mapping; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Computational Biology; Evolution, Molecular; Phylogeny; Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid; Synteny; Haplotypes; Genes; Genome; Molecular Sequence Data; Female; DNA Copy Number Variations
RMID: 0020093154
DOI: 10.1126/science.1178158
Appears in Collections:Molecular and Biomedical Science publications
Environment Institute publications

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